ftp.cc.uoc.gr
rfc2154
This is a purely informative rendering of an RFC that includes verified errata. This rendering may not be used as a reference.

The following 'Verified' errata have been incorporated in this document: EID 2081
Network Working Group                                          S. Murphy
Request for Comments: 2154                                     M. Badger
Category: Experimental                                     B. Wellington
                                             Trusted Information Systems
                                                               June 1997

                      OSPF with Digital Signatures

Status of this Memo

   This memo defines an Experimental Protocol for the Internet
   community.  This memo does not specify an Internet standard of any
   kind.  Discussion and suggestions for improvement are requested.
   Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

   This memo describes the extensions to OSPF required to add digital
   signature authentication to Link State data, and to provide a
   certification mechanism for router data.  Added LSA processing and
   key management is detailed.  A method for migration from, or co-
   existence with, standard OSPF V2 is described.

Table of Contents

   1 Acknowledgements .............................................   2
   2 Introduction .................................................   2
   3 LSA Processing ...............................................   4
   3.1 Signed LSA .................................................   4
   3.2 Router Public Key LSA (PKLSA) ..............................   5
   3.3 MaxAge Processing ..........................................   7
   4 Key Management ...............................................   8
   4.1 Identifying Keys ...........................................   8
   4.1.1 Identifying Router Keys and PKLSAs .......................   8
   4.1.2 Identifying TE Public Keys ...............................   8
   4.1.3 Key to use for Signing ...................................   9
   4.1.4 Key to use for Verification ..............................   9
   4.2 Trusted Entity (TE) Requirements ...........................  10
   4.3 Scope for Keys and Signature Algorithms.....................  10
   4.4 Router Key Replacement .....................................  11
   4.5 Trusted Entity Key Replacement .............................  12
   4.6 Flexible Cryptographic Environments ........................  14
   4.6.1 Multiple Signature Algorithms ............................  14
   4.6.2 Multiple Trusted Entities ................................  15
   4.6.3 Multiple Keys for One Router .............................  16
   5 Compatibility with Standard OSPF V2 ..........................  16
   6 Special Considerations/Restrictions for the ABR-ASBR .........  17
   7 LSA formats ..................................................  18

   7.1 Router Public Key LSA (PKLSA) ..............................  18
   7.2 Router Public Key Certificate ..............................  20
   7.3 Signed LSA .................................................  23
   8 Configuration Information ....................................  26
   9 Remaining Vulnerabilities ....................................  26
   9.1 Area Border Routers ........................................  27
   9.2 Internal Routers ...........................................  27
   9.3 Autonomous System Border Routers ...........................  28
   10 Security Considerations .....................................  28
   11 References ..................................................  29
   12 Authors' Addresses ..........................................  29

1.  Acknowledgements

   The idea of signing routing information is not new.  Foremost, of
   course, there is the design that Radia Perlman reported in her thesis
   [4] and in her book [5] for signing link state information and for
   distribution of the public keys used in the signing.  IDPR [7] also
   recommends the use of public key based signatures of link state
   information.  Kumar and Crowcroft [2] discuss the use of secret and
   public key authentication of inter-domain routing protocols.  Finn [1]
   discusses the use of secret and public key authentication of several
   different routing protocols.  The design reported here is closest to
   that reported in [4] and [7].  It should be noted that [4] also
   presents techniques for protecting the forwarding of data packets, a
   topic that is not considered here, as we consider it not within the
   scope of the OSPF working group.

   The authors would also like to acknowledge many fruitful discussions
   with many members of the OSPF working group, particularly Fred Baker
   of Cisco Systems, Dennis Ferguson of MCI Telecommunications Corp.,
   John Moy of Cascade Communications Corp., Curtis Villamizar of ANS,
   Inc., and Rob Coltun of FORE Systems.

2.  Introduction

   It is well recognized that there is a need for greater security in
   routing protocols. OSPF currently provides "simple password"
   authentication where the password travels "in the clear", and there
   is work in progress[11] to provide keyed MD5 authentication for OSPF
   protocol packets between neighbors.  The simple password
   authentication is vulnerable because any listener can discover and
   use the password.  Keyed MD5 authentication is very useful for
   protection of protocol packets passed between neighbors, but does not
   address authentication of routing data that is flooded from source to
   eventual destination, through routers which may themselves be faulty
   or subverted.

   The basic idea of this proposal is to add digital signatures to OSPF
   LSA data, distribute certified router information and keys, and use a
   neighbor-to-neighbor authentication algorithm (like keyed MD5) to
   protect local protocol exchanges.  The content of a Hello packet,
   Link State Request, Link State Update, or Database Description will
   be protected by the neighbor-to-neighbor algorithm.  The LSAs that
   are being flooded inside the Link State Update packets are
   individually protected by a digital signature.  Each LSA will be
   signed by the originator of that information and the signature will
   stay with the data in its travels via OSPF flooding.  This will
   provide end-to-end integrity and authentication for LSA data. The
   digital signature attached to an LSA by the source router provides
   assurance that the data comes from the advertising router.  It will
   also ensure that the data has not been modified by some other router
   in the course of flooding.  In the case where incorrect routing data
   is originated by a faulty router, the signature will identify the
   source of the problem.

   Digital signatures are implemented using public key cryptography.
   There are some good books on the subject of cryptography [6], but the
   high level view of how this design uses public key cryptography is as
   follows: Each router has a pair of keys, a public key and a private
   key.  The private key is used to generate a unique signature of a
   block of data (in this case, the LSA). Each router signs its LSAs by
   first running a one-way hash algorithm (like MD5 or SHA) on the data,
   and then using its private key to sign the digest.  The signature of
   an LSA is appended to the LSA. The public key can be used by any
   other router to verify the signature.  The private key must be kept
   secret by one router and the public key must be distributed to all
   the routers that will receive link state information from the signer.
   The distribution is accomplished by creating a new LSA, the Public
   Key LSA (PKLSA), and distributing it via the standard OSPF flooding
   procedure.  Flooding will ensure that a router public key is sent
   everywhere that the router's signed LSAs are sent.

   Any router can send out a public key and claim to be a given router,
   so the public key itself provides no assurance of the actual identity
   of the sender. This assurance must be provided by a Trusted Entity.
   The Trusted Entity (TE) is a system that generates certificates for
   routers.  A certificate is a packet of information about a router
   that identifies the router and supplies a public key. Certified
   router information will include the router id, its role, the address
   ranges that the router may advertise, a timestamp and the router's
   public key. The certificate is signed by the TE.  Each router must be
   configured with a certificate and a TE public key to use in verifying
   other routers' certificates.  A router PKLSA contains the certificate
   for that router.  A router receiving a PKLSA verifies the certificate
   using the TE public key, and then verifies the whole LSA using the

   router public key contained in the certificate. Successful
   verification provides assurance that the PKLSA is from the correct
   router, and that it has not been altered by any other router in the
   flood path.

   OSPF with Digital Signatures is backward compatible with standard
   OSPF V2 in a limited way.  Within an AS there may be "signed" areas
   and "unsigned" areas.  The behavior of a mixed AS is discussed in
   section 5.

   Digital signatures for OSPF LSAs can be implemented with the
   following major functions:

   (1) Support for a digital signature algorithm

   (2) Support for a signed version of all routing information LSAs

   (3) Support for a new LSA: Router Public Key LSA (PKLSA)

   (4) A mechanism for key certification and certificate distribution

   (5) Extra configuration data (detail in section 7):

         Trusted Entity (TE) information and key(s)
         Router certification data and key
         Area environment flag (signed/unsigned)
         Timing intervals

   An implementation of this design exists, based on the OSPF in Gated
   version 3.5Beta3.  This implementation is available for
   use/experimentation.  Please contact the authors for information.

3.  LSA Processing

3.1.  Signed LSA

   A signed LSA contains the standard OSPF V2 header and data plus key
   identification information, a signature length and a signature.  The
   top bit of the LS type field is set to indicate the presence of a
   signature.  The signature covers the LSA header (starting with the
   options field), the LSA data, and the key identification information
   and the signature length that must be appended to the LSA data.
   There are two exceptions to this coverage: first, an LSA created with
   age=MaxAge has a signature that begins with the age field (see
   section on maxage); second, the LSA header checksum is set to zero
   for the generation of the signature.  To assist in parsing the
   message, the key id information and the signature length fields are
   placed at the end of the LSA, following the signature.  However, the

   message must be signed and verified with these fields immediately
   appended to the LSA data.  This can be accomplished either by doing
   the sign and verify "in parts" (allowed by RSAREF), or by storing the
   LSA data with appended fields and the LSA signature separately in the
   link state database (LSDB).

   When a signed LSA is received, the signature can be verified using
   the public key of the advertising router contained in the advertising
   router's PKLSA.  If the signature verifies, then the signed LSA is
   stored for use in routing calculations. If the signature verification
   fails, the LSA must be discarded. If the identified key is not
   available (in a PKLSA from the advertising router), then the signed
   LSA must be stored for a period of time defined by the configurable
   MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY interval.  If the key arrives within this interval,
   the LSA will be processed then.  If the key does not arrive within
   this interval, the LSA will be discarded.  This delay period prevents
   loss of routing information due to LSAs arriving prior to their
   associated PKLSAs (which should not normally be the case, but could
   happen).

   If the LSA is a Router Links LSA, the router's advertised links must
   be checked against the allowed address ranges stored in the PKLSA for
   the advertising router.  All network links (link types 2 and 3) must
   have an IP address that fits in one of the ranges defined by the list
   of address ranges in the PKLSA (format 7.2).  If there is a link that
   does not fit into one of these ranges, then an error must be logged
   and the LSA must be discarded.  Careful subnetting and corresponding
   ranges can provide very tight control on what is advertised.  A much
   less restrictive, but still useful, level of control can be obtained
   by defining allowed address ranges for an area, so that all routers
   in an area could be configured with the same set.  To trivially
   satisfy this checking, one range with a zero address and mask can be
   defined that contains all IP addresses.

   Link State Acknowledgements must be sent for all LSAs that are
   discarded due to verification failures, that are stored waiting for
   keys, and that are discarded because they are advertising a link that
   they are not allowed to advertise.

3.2.  Router Public Key LSA (PKLSA)

   A Router Public Key LSA (PKLSA) is sent in the same manner as all
   other LSAs.  This LSA contains the router's public key and
   identifying information that has been certified by a Trusted Entity.
   The router public key is used to verify signatures produced by this
   router.  There is only one PKLSA stored per router in the LSDB for an
   area, so the Router Id and LS type can be used to retrieve a given
   PKLSA.  The Router Id is stored in the PKLSA Link State Id field to

   use in retrieving the PKLSA. Identification information in the
   certified data (TE Id, Rtr Key Id) can be used to uniquely identify
   the current router key (section 7.2).

   To assist in parsing the message, the router signature length and the
   certification length fields are at the end of the LSA, following the
   signature.  The message must be signed and verified with these fields
   immediately appended to the LSA data.  The router signature of the
   PKLSA is verified in the same manner as other signed LSAs.  In
   addition, the certification must be verified using the referenced TE
   public key.  If either verification fails, for any reason, the PKLSA
   is discarded.

   A successfully verified PKLSA is stored for use in verifying signed
   LSAs from the advertising router. For every router that this router
   is in contact with, there may be one PKLSA stored at any given time.
   Each PKLSA is uniquely identified by the values (TE Id, Rtr Key Id)
   in the certified data (format in 7.2).  When a PKLSA arrives for a
   given router, and there is already a PKLSA stored for that router,
   the PKLSA with the most recent "Create Time" is the one kept.

   Whenever groups of LSAs are sent by a router (as when synchronizing
   databases or sending updates), the PKLSAs must be sent/requested
   before other LSAs to minimize the time spent processing LSAs that
   arrive prior to their associated keys.  The PKLSA is sent at
   intervals like all other LSAs, and it is sent immediately if a router
   obtains a new key to distribute. A PKLSA is sent via OSPF flooding
   within an OSPF area.  PKLSAs are not flooded outside an area with the
   exception of an Autonomous System Border Router's PKLSAs which must
   be flooded wherever AS external LSAs are flooded.  The decision to
   flood or not flood can be implemented by checking the router role
   (Rtr, ABR, ASBR, ABR-ASBR) stored in the certified part of the PKLSA.

   A router may flush its keys from routing tables by flooding a PKLSA
   for that key with age=MaxAge.  This is called premature aging of the
   PKLSA.  A key can also be removed from routing tables (superseded) by
   a PKLSA from the same router, containing a valid certificate for a
   new key with a more recent Create Time.  If a key is superseded by a
   more recent key it is not necessary to flush the old key with a
   "MaxAge" PKLSA.

   When a new key is received, the LSAs stored in the LSDB that are
   signed with the old key must be replaced within MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY.
   if the sending router is working properly.  This is because a router
   distributing a new key sends all of its self-originated LSAs signed
   with the new key immediately after sending the new PKLSA.  (See
   section 4.4 on Router Key Replacement).  To ensure that data signed
   with an old (possibly subverted) key does not persist in the LSDB in

   error, all LSAs signed with a flushed or superseded key are aged to
   within MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY of MaxAge.  This should allow time for the
   new LSAs signed with the new key to arrive.  If new LSAs do not
   arrive, or if the key has been flushed and not replaced, then the old
   LSA data will disappear from the LSDB in a timely fashion.

   Link State Acknowledgements must be sent for PKLSAs that are
   discarded due to verification failures or because the PKLSA was less
   recent than the one already stored.

3.3.  MaxAge Processing

   The age field in the OSPF LSA header is used to keep track of how
   long a given LSA has been in the system.  When the age field reaches
   MaxAge, a router stops using the LSA for routing, and it floods the
   MaxAge LSA to make sure that all routers stop using this LSA.  In the
   normal course of the OSPF protocol, an LSA is always replaced by an
   updated version before the age reaches MaxAge, unless the advertising
   router fails, or changes in the AS have made the routing information
   in the LSA inaccurate.  An LSA with age=MaxAge is either:


   (1) being intentionally flushed from the AS by the advertising router
       because the information in it is no longer accurate, or

   (2) an orphan LSA that has aged to MaxAge because its originating
       router has not refreshed it at the normal refresh intervals.

   The age field cannot generally be included in the signature, because
   it must be updated by routers other than the originating router.  For
   the same reason, the age field is not included in the checksum
   computation.  The age field must be protected, because if a faulty
   router started to age out other router's LSAs, it would effectively
   deny service to those other routers.

   To protect the age field, the signature must include the age field if
   and only if the originating router creates an LSA with age=MaxAge.
   Verification of the signature on a signed LSA must include the age
   field if and only if the age field value is MaxAge.  In this manner,
   the originating router can flush an LSA, but other routers cannot.
   An LSA that ages to MaxAge in the LSDB of any router is still
   discarded by that router, but it is not synchronously flushed from
   the AS.

   An LSA will be removed from a router's Link State Database in one of
   two ways: 1) the router receives a version of the LSA with the age
   field set to MaxAge and a valid signature that covers the age field,
   or 2) the LSA incrementally reaches MaxAge while it is stored by the
   router.

   If a standard OSPF V2 router goes down, an LSA from that router will
   age in the LSDBs of each remaining router until it reaches MaxAge
   somewhere.  As soon as it reaches MaxAge in some router's LSDB it is
   flooded, and this causes it to be flushed from the AS in a
   synchronized fashion.  If router running OSPF with digital signatures
   goes down, its signed LSAs will be aged out by each remaining router
   individually.  This will slow database convergence but the databases
   will still converge, and a fairly obvious security hole will be
   closed.

4.  Key Management

4.1.  Identifying Keys

4.1.1.  Identifying Router Keys and PKLSAs

   A router key is identified by the Router Id, and the identifiers
   associated with the particular key in its certificate: TE Id and
   Router Key Id.  All three of these values are stored in a PKLSA
   (format in 7.1).  The Router Id is the standard LSA header
   Advertising Router.  The (TE Id, Rtr Key Id) are stored in the PKLSA
   certified data.  The TE Id is a number assigned to a Trusted Entity
   that must uniquely identify one TE in the AS.  The TE Id in a
   certificate identifies the TE that produced the certificate.  The Rtr
   Key Id is associated with a key by the Trusted Entity that produced
   the certificate.  The Trusted Entity must produce a stream of Rtr Key
   Ids for one router such that the router will not re-use a key id
   until all references to the last key having that id are gone from the
   AS.  If a key is re-played, or re-used too soon, the Create Time in
   the key certification will determine which key is current.  Rtr Key
   Ids do not have to be sequential.

4.1.2.  Identifying TE Public Keys

   Each TE public key has an associated TE Id, TE Key Id.  The
   combination of (TE Id, TE Key Id) uniquely identifies one TE public
   key in the AS.  The TE Id is a number assigned to a Trusted Entity

   that uniquely identifies one TE in the AS.  The TE Key Id must
   identify one particular key for a TE at any given time.  The TE Key
   Id distinguishes between a new key and an old key for the same TE.
   The TE Key Id also differentiates between keys for different
   signature algorithms if one TE serves multiple algorithms.  Each TE
   can have at most one current key per signature algorithm.

   There can be multiple TE keys stored on each router.  A TE public key
   is used to verify the certificates issued by other routers, and in an
   AS with several TEs, any given router may need several TE public
   keys.  TE Key Ids do not have to be used sequentially, and they can
   be re-used.  There is no timestamp for TE keys because these are not
   certified.

   It is the responsibility of Configuration Management to ensure that
   TE Key Ids are not re-used before all references to a previously used
   key with the same (TE Id, TE Key Id) are gone from the AS, that a
   given (TE Id, TE Key Id) on one router identifies the same key as it
   does on any other router, and that the rules for TE Key Replacement
   (section 4.5) are followed.

4.1.3.  Key to use for Signing

   A router is configured with a pair of keys.  The private key is
   protected from disclosure and is used for signing.  The public key is
   flooded in a PKLSA and is used for verifying signatures.  A router
   may have one key per area to use for signing at any given time.  A
   router may use the same key for several or all areas.

4.1.4.  Key to use for Verification

   There are three uses of signature verification in this design:

   (1) The signature in a signed LSA (format in 7.3) can be verified
       with the public key distributed by the advertising router in a
       Public Key LSA.  A signed LSA contains the (TE Id, Rtr Key Id) of
       the key used to sign it.  The signed LSA's Advertising Router Id
       is used to retrieve the router's PKLSA , and the (TE Id, Rtr Key
       Id) indicates if the router key in the PKLSA is the same as the
       one used to generate the signature.

   (2) The router's signature in a PKLSA (format in 7.1) is verified
       with the public key contained in that PKLSA.

   (3) The PKLSA contains data certified with a signature generated
       by a TE.  The PKLSA certified data contains the (TE Id, TE Key
       Id) for the TE key that can be used to verify the certificate
       (format in 7.2).  TE public keys must be configured on each
       router.

4.2.  Trusted Entity (TE) Requirements

   This design does not specify how the Trusted Entity (TE) must be
   implemented, where it must reside, or how it must communicate with
   routers.  There are several very different possible approaches to the
   implementation of a Trusted Entity (e.g., an offline system with
   distribution of keys by floppy or secure e-mail, an online automated
   key distribution center, etc.) This design does mandate certain
   requirements for what a Trusted Entity must do.  A Trusted Entity
   must generate a certificate for each signing router that contains
   individualized information about that router (format in 7.2) and is
   signed with the Trusted Entity private key.  The Trusted Entity must
   have a unique TE Id for itself, it must create a Rtr Key Id for each
   router key that is unique for the given Router for this TE at this
   time, and it must timestamp certificates with a Create Time that is
   consistent for itself and for any other Trusted Entities operating in
   the AS.  Note: routers do not have to be time-synched, but TEs do.
   Create Time is used by routers as a relative measure to determine
   which key is more recent.

   The TE Public key, TE Id, TE Key Id and Signature Algorithm must be
   made available to each router processing certificates from this TE.

   A TE can theoretically create certificates for more than one
   signature algorithm.  The TE key and the router public key certified
   do not have to be of the same signature algorithm.

   There can be more than one TE in an AS but the TE Id must identify a
   unique TE.

4.3.  Scope for Keys and Signature Algorithms

   The concept of "scope" relates to Router Keys, TE Keys, and Signature
   Algorithms.

   (1) The scope of a PKLSA and therefore a router key, is defined to
       be the set of routers that will receive and store that PKLSA in
       the course of OSPF flooding.  A router produces a PKLSA for each
       attached area.  In a router with more than one area, the PKLSAs
       for each area may match, or each may contain a different key.
       The scope of PKLSA for an internal router is all the routers in
       that area.  An ABR has multiple PKLSAs, each having a scope of

       one attached area.  The scope of an ASBR's PKLSA is the same as
       the scope of the ASBRs ASEs - all the routers in all the non-stub
       areas in the AS.  An ASBR that is an ABR produces multiple PKLSAs
       that each have a scope of all the routers in all the non-stub
       areas in the AS.  (This last case results in some situations that
       require special management - section 6)

   (2) The scope of a TE key is defined to be the set of routers that are
       configured with this key.  If a system is configured properly,
       then a TE public key will be configured on all the routers that
       will receive PKLSAs certified by that TE key.  The minimum scope
       for a TE key is an area.  If one router distributes a key
       certified with a given TE key, then all the routers in the area
       must be able toverify the certificate.  A TE Key certifying an
       ASBRs key must have a scope of all non-stub areas in the AS.  If
       the TE key is not on some router that receives PKLSAs certified by
       that TE key, then those PKLSAs and all the LSAs that require them
       will be discarded. A TE key gets to all the routers in its scope
       via out-of-band configuration.

   (3) The scope of a signature algorithm is defined to be the set of
       routers that are capable of verifying the given algorithm's
       signatures.  The minimum scope for a signature algorithm is an
       area.  All routers in an area must be able to verify any signature
       algorithm used for signing by any router in the area.  The
       algorithm used to certify an ASBRs key must have a scope of all
       non-stub areas in the AS if the ASEs are to be accessible
       everywhere (see section 6).  If a signature algorithm is not
       available to verify an LSA, then the LSA must be discarded.  If a
       signature algorithm is not available to verify the certification
       in a PKLSA, then the PKLSA must be discarded.

4.4.  Router Key Replacement

   Router keys should be changed periodically, and immediately if a key
   is found to be compromised.  The regular period for changing a key is
   some locally determined function of the size of the key and the level
   of security needed.

   Each router can have ONE valid key per area at any given time.
   Restricting the number of keys at a given time to one key per router
   per area allows key replacement to also serve the purpose of key
   revocation, without having a revocation list and without routers
   having synchronized time.  Each key for the router/area revokes the
   last key, provided the "new" key has a more recent Create Time than
   the last key.  The Create Time in each certificate is used to prevent
   an old key from being reused, but this Create Time is used only for
   comparing the relative ages of certificates, and does not require the

   router to run a time synchronization protocol itself.  An ABR can use
   the same key for all it's attached areas, or it can have a unique key
   for each area.  This allows an AS to be managed by area with each
   area potentially having a different TE, signature algorithm, key
   size, and/or key.

   When a new key replaces an old key, the router must quickly replace
   LSAs signed with the old key with LSAs signed with the new key. To
   change a router key the following steps must be followed:

   (1) A valid certificate for the new key must be obtained for the
       router.

   (2) The router builds and sends a new PKLSA with the new certificate.

   (3) The router signs each self-originated LSA with the new key and
       sends them.

   When a PKLSA is received:

   (1) If the PKLSA's age = MaxAge, remove the PKLSA from the LSDB and
       age LSAs signed with this key to be MaxAge - MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY,
       if they were not already older than this.  This is a way to get
       rid of a key that should no longer be used.

   (2) If the PKLSA is a refresh LSA for an existing key, update the
       LSDB.

   (3) If the PKLSA contains a different key than the one currently
       stored for this router, compare the certificate Create Time.  If
       the PKLSA key is less recent, discard it.  If the PKLSA key is
       more recent, install it in the LSDB and remove the old key from
       the LSDB.  If an old key was deleted from the LSDB, age LSAs
       signed with this key to be MaxAge - MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY, if they
       were not already older than this.

4.5.  Trusted Entity Key Replacement

   It is necessary to change a TE public key periodically.  It is
   recommended that the TE public key be relatively large, so that it
   does not frequently require replacement.  A router may store multiple
   TE public keys.  Each key is uniquely identified by TE Id and TE Key
   Id.  TE keys are used to verify certificates received from other
   routers in their PKLSAs.  When a router sends a new certificate
   signed with a new TE Key, all the routers that receive the PKLSA
   containing the certificate must have that new TE Key in order to
   verify, store, and use that PKLSA.  Management of TE public keys is
   done outside the OSPF protocol, and a method is suggested, but not

   mandated by this design.  Initially all routers must be configured
   with the TE Keys they will need to verify the certificates they will
   receive.  To prevent use of a (possibly compromised) TE Key, that key
   must be replaced by a new (possibly null) TE Key having the same TE
   Id and signature algorithm.  A compromised or faulty router can
   continue using certificates signed with the old TE key, but none of
   the properly configured routers will be able to verify them.

   Changing a TE public key presents a design challenge.  When a TE
   Public Key is changed, all the certificates depending on that key
   must also change.  The router keys in the certificates may or may not
   be changed at the same time.  When the TE key and certificates
   change, all PKLSAs depending on these must be reissued. In order to
   verify these new certificates, all routers receiving the new PKLSAs
   must have the new TE Public Key.  So, the TE key replacement must be
   a synchronized event.  Routers are not required to have synchronized
   clocks.  The TE public key may well be distributed to the routers via
   an out-of-band mechanism (like a smart-card reader or other sneaker-
   net method).  It is not reasonable to require that all the routers
   obtain the TE public key at the same time.  There are probably
   several methods for meeting these requirements.  The method tested in
   our implementation is as follows:

   (1) Define a period of time needed to get the new TE key on all
       routers.  This could be minutes, hours, even days depending on
       how the distribution is accomplished.  This time period is a
       configuration value for each router (TE_KEY_DIST_INT) and must be
       the same for all routers sharing a TE.

   (2) Install a new TE key and associated certificates (if there are
       any) on each router.  Signal the router code when the new TE key
       is available to be accessed.

   (3) The router sets a timer for the TE_KEY_DIST_INT.  The router
       sets a flag indicating the presence of a new TE key.

   (4) For each router, if the timer goes off:

         Access the new TE key.
         If there are new certificates, build and send a new PKLSA.
         Age all PKLSAs in the LSDB certified by the old TE Key
                 to MaxAge - MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY.

   (5) For each router, if a PKLSA certified by a new TE key comes in
       before the timer goes off:

         If the new TE key cannot be accessed, discard the PKLSA and
                 log an ERROR.
         Access the new TE key.
         Process the received PKLSA.
         If there are new certificates, build and send a new PKLSA.
         Age all PKLSAs in the LSDB certified by the old TE key
                 to MaxAge - MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY.

   The effect of this method is that it takes a predetermined interval
   of time to change the TE public key.  That interval is the amount of
   time from the installation of the new TE key on the FIRST router
   installed, until the time that router reads the key in.  By the time
   the first router reads the key in, all other routers should have the
   new key.  If some router does not get the new TE key in time, it will
   be unable to verify all the new PKLSAs that are received.  It will
   log error messages and route data based on it's old database until
   those LSAs time out.  The simple way to fix a router in this error
   condition is to load the new TE key and restart the router.  If this
   error is expected to occur, and restarting the router is not
   acceptable, then some special purpose code will be needed to read in
   the TE key after it has been otherwise distributed, and do database
   synchronization to catch up with the other routers.

   The group of routers that need the new TE key are all the routers in
   the scope of that Trusted Entity.

4.6.  Flexible Cryptographic Environments

   It is likely that an AS will have one cryptographic environment in
   use throughout the AS, with one trusted entity, one signature
   algorithm in use, and one key in use per router.  To allow those
   cases where this is not true, multiple signature algorithms, multiple
   trusted entities, and multiple keys per router are allowed.

4.6.1.  Multiple Signature Algorithms

   It is possible to support multiple signature algorithms.  Each router
   and TE key has a signature algorithm associated with it.  All routers
   sending a key with a given algorithm must be capable of generating
   signatures of that kind, and all routers receiving keys with a given
   algorithm must be able to verify the signatures.  If a router
   receives an LSA signed with a signature algorithm that it does not
   support, the LSA must be discarded.  LSAs that cannot be verified by
   a router are not flooded by that router.  When using multiple
   signature algorithms, the scope of each algorithm must be determined

   (see section 4.3), and routers must be configured with support for
   these algorithms accordingly.

   If an Area supports two signature algorithms and is to have full
   connectivity, some routers may sign with algorithm A and others with
   algorithm B, but all routers in the area must be able to verify
   signatures for A and B.  In an AS that is divided into areas, it is
   possible for each area to have a different signature algorithm.  The
   ABR connecting two areas would have to support both algorithms, but
   the internal routers in a given area would only have to know one
   algorithm.

   ASBRs present a problem for this sort of division.  ASEs flood
   throughout the non-stub areas of an AS.  Any router that cannot
   verify an ASE will discard it without flooding.  So, to have access
   to an ASE, a router, and all the routers in the flooding path, must
   support the algorithm used by the ASBR.  One way around these
   difficulties is to have a lowest-common-denominator algorithm that is
   used for signing by all ASBRs and is supported for verification
   throughout the AS in addition to other algorithms used.  Another
   approach is to place ASBRs on the backbone, and configure all areas
   using a signature algorithm different from the ASBR to have a default
   route to the backbone.  A combined approach will allow an ASBR to be
   in a non-backbone area if it uses a signature algorithm supported on
   the backbone, and the areas using different signature algorithms are
   configured with a default to the backbone.  There are special
   limitations in the case of a router that is an ABR and also an ASBR:
   see section 6.

   There is currently only one signature algorithm (RSA_MD5) defined for
   use by this design.  The RSA algorithm is defined in PKCS #1 [9] and
   the signature and key formats used by this design are defined in
   RFC2065 [10].

4.6.2.  Multiple Trusted Entities

   It is possible to have multiple Trusted Entities in an AS.  Each TE
   has a unique TE identifier.  Every router receiving PKLSAs certified
   by a given TE must have that TE's public key.  If a router receives a
   PKLSA certified by a TE for which it does not have a public key, the
   PKLSA must be discarded.  When using multiple TEs, the scope of each
   TE must be determined (see section 4.3), and routers in this scope
   must be configured with the TE key.

4.6.3.  Multiple Keys for One Router

   An ABR may have one key for each attached area.  These keys may
   differ in size, algorithm and/or certifying TE.  Generally, each key
   will have a "scope" of the attached area, and there will be no
   conflict between keys.

   There are special limitations in the case of a router that is an ABR
   and also an ASBR: see section 6.

5.  Compatibility with Standard OSPF V2

   OSPF with Digital Signatures is compatible with standard OSPF V2 in
   an autonomous system.  Within an AS, there may be "signed" areas and
   "unsigned" areas.  There will never be both signed and unsigned LSAs
   used in any one area.  Each area will have an environment flag
   indicating whether it is "signed" or "unsigned".  The environment
   flag is a per area configuration value for the router.  The signed
   areas must contain all routers running OSPF with Digital Signatures,
   and the unsigned areas contain routers running standard OSPF V2 code
   (or OSPF with Digital Signatures with all areas set to be unsigned).
   An area border router connecting a signed to an unsigned area must be
   running OSPF with Digital Signatures with one area set to be
   unsigned.

   In order to arrange this limited compatibility, a router running OSPF
   with Digital Signatures must be able to process both signed and
   unsigned LSAs.  The only router that will actually be processing both
   kinds of LSAs is an Area Border Router connecting a signed area to an
   unsigned area.  An ABR connecting a signed to an unsigned area will
   generate signed summaries for one area and unsigned summaries for the
   other.  An ABR must not flood signed LSAs into unsigned areas.  An
   ABR must not flood unsigned LSAs into signed areas.  This will result
   in AS External LSAs being dropped if they reach an area that has a
   different environment from the one in which they were created.  There
   are special limitations in the case of a router that is an ABR and
   also an ASBR: see section 6.

   Complete connectivity is provided within the AS, because of the
   summarization provided by ABRs connecting signed and unsigned areas.
   There are limitations on connectivity to AS external routes in an AS
   with a mixture of signed and unsigned areas, depending on the
   location of AS border routers.  An ASBR in a signed area will
   generate signed ASE LSAs.  These LSAs will be flooded to every
   contiguously connected signed area.  The connected signed areas are
   the "scope" of these ASEs.  A host located in an area that is not in
   this scope, will not have connectivity to these external routes.  An
   ASBR in an unsigned area will generate unsigned ASE LSAs.  These LSAs

   will have a scope of all the contiguously connected unsigned areas,
   and will be available to hosts in this scope.  To arrange complete
   connectivity to an ASE route in an AS with signed and unsigned areas:

   (1) Place the ASBR on the backbone.

   (2) Signed Backbone: have some ABR in each unsigned area advertise a
       default route to the backbone.

   (3) Unsigned Backbone: have some ABR in each signed area advertise a
       default route to the backbone.

   Given this design for a mixed AS, routing is available throughout the
   AS, but the authentication and integrity provided by this design will
   be effective only for routes that are inside a signed area, or
   traverse only signed areas.  There is no mechanism for a data packet
   to state a preference for signed routes.  The basic rules of the OSPF
   protocol ensure that intra-area routes are preferred to inter-area
   routes, that routes within the AS are preferred to AS external
   routes, and that inter-area routes go from area1->backbone->area2.
   OSPF does not allow looping, or routes of the form area1->area2-
   >area3.  Because of these properties of OSPF routing, an AS can 
   contain signed and unsigned areas, and achieve a predictable level of
   authentication.

EID 2081 (Verified) is as follows:

Section: 5

Original Text:

Because of these properties of OSFP routing, an AS can
   contain signed and unsigned areas, and achieve a predictable level of
   authentication.

Corrected Text:

Because of these properties of OSPF routing, an AS can
   contain signed and unsigned areas, and achieve a predictable level of
   authentication.
Notes:
s/OSFP/OSPF
6. Special Considerations/Restrictions for the ABR-ASBR There are special restrictions and configuration considerations for a router running OSPF with Digital Signatures that is both an Area Border Router and an Autonomous System Border Router. An ASBR produces AS external LSAs that are flooded throughout the non-stub areas of the AS. An ABR that is generating digital signatures may be using a different key, certifying Trusted Entity, or signature algorithm for each of its attached areas, or it might be signing in some areas and not in others. An ABR/ASBR with no restrictions on its configuration could produce multiple versions of an ASE that would all be flooded throughout the non-stub areas of the AS. The results of this production of multiple versions of LSAs would be detrimental to performance, and could produce unpredictable routing behavior. The PKLSA of an ASBR is also flooded throughout the non-stub areas of the AS, and in the case of an ABR/ASBR there could be multiple, distinct PKLSAs for a given router, one per attached area, all being flooded throughout the AS. If two distinct PKLSAs from one ABR/ASBR router were present in one area, the key with the most recent create time would be stored, and all LSAs signed with a less recent key would be unverifiable. The simplest way to deal with this problem, and the method recommended by this document, is the following: If an ASBR must also be an ABR, then the security configuration (key, signature algorithm, certifying Trusted Entity, environment = signed/unsigned) for all attached areas must be the same. This way the PKLSA and the ASEs produced for each area match, and there is no proliferation of versions of LSAs. 7. LSA formats 7.1. Router Public Key LSA (PKLSA) This LSA is the vehicle for distribution of a router public key. The PKLSA is sent by one router, and stored by all the other routers in the flooding scope. The PKLSA contains the public key that other routers will use to verify the signatures created by this router. A Router PKLSA will be communicated in the usual database exchange and via flooding mechanisms. The regular period for sending this LSA is LSRefreshTime. The Router PKLSA will also be sent when there is a new key, or a key to be flushed from the system. The flooding scope of a PKLSA is the area, except in the case of ASBRs. The flooding scope of an ASBR's PKLSA is the same as that of the ASEs. The "role" of the router (RTR, ABR, ASBR, ABR-ASBR) is stored in the PKLSA inside the certificate, and can be checked during flooding. ROUTER PUBLIC KEY LSA 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | LS Age | Options | LS Type | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Link State ID | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Advertising Router | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | LS Sequence Number | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | LS Checksum | Length | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Certificate (format in 7.2) / +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Signature / +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Cert Length | Sign Length | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ LS AGE Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. OPTIONS Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. LS TYPE 16 for Router Public Key LSA. First bit set to indicate a signed LSA. LINK STATE ID Contains the Advertising Router Id (see next field). ADVERTISING ROUTER Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. LS SEQUENCE NUMBER Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. LS CHECKSUM Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. Checksum does not cover the signature. LENGTH Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. Length does include the Signature field, Cert Length and Sign Length. CERTIFICATE Format in section 7.2. SIGNATURE The advertising router's signature of this LSA. This can be verified using the enclosed Router Public Key. The signature covers the LSA header and message starting with the LSA header options field and ending with the Trusted Entity certification field. For sign and verify, the last two fields (Cert Length and Sign Length) are appended immediately after the Certificate. When complete, the signature is inserted between the Certification and the Cert Length. There are two exceptions to this coverage: 1) If the LSA was generated with an age=MaxAge, then the signature begins with the age field (see section 3.3). 2) The checksum in the LSA Header is set to zero for the computation of the signature. A pad is added to the end of the signature field to allow the next field to begin on a (4 byte) word boundary. The format used for an RSA-MD5 signature is defined in section 4.1.2 of RFC2065 [10]. CERT LENGTH The length in bytes of the Certification inside the Certificate. Does not include pad that may follow Certification. SIGN LENGTH The length in bytes of the Signature. Does not include pad that may follow Signature. 7.2. Router Public Key Certificate A router public key certificate is a package of data signed by a Trusted Entity. This certificate is included in the router PKLSA and in the router configuration information. To change any of the values in the certificate, a new certificate must be obtained from a TE. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Router Id | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | TE Id | TE Key Id | Rtr Key Id | Sig Alg | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Create Time | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Key Field Length | Router Role | #Net Ranges | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | IP Address | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Address Mask | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | IP Address/Address Mask for each Net Range ... / | ... / +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Router Public Key | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Certification / +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ROUTER ID Advertising Router. TE ID TE Id must uniquely identify one TE in the AS. A number between 1-250. 0 reserved for null. 251-255 reserved for future needs. TE KEY ID Must uniquely identify a particular key for a given TE at any given time. A TE Key Id may be re-used after all references to it are gone from the AS. A number between 1-250. 0 reserved for null. 251-255 reserved for future needs. RTR KEY ID Must be unique for the TE and Router at any given time. The combination of (TE Id, Rtr Id, Rtr Key Id) uniquely identifies a particular router key at a given time. A Rtr Key Id may be re-used after all references to it are gone from the AS. Create Time resolves any conflict that could be caused by replaying old keys. A number between 1-250. 0 reserved for null. 251-255 reserved for future needs. SIG ALG The signature algorithm for the Router Public Key. The signature algorithm encompasses the hash algorithm used as well. Currently defined value = RSA-MD5(1). Values 2-252 are available for future definition. Values 0 and 253-255 are reserved. The Sig Alg value is registered with IANA. Future signature algorithms will have to be defined or referenced in this document, and registered with IANA. CREATE TIME Timestamp set by the TE. An unsigned number of seconds since the start of January 1, 1970, GMT, ignoring leap seconds. Used to compare two certificates and determine which is more recent. Requires that time synchronization for TEs, but not for routers. KEY FIELD LENGTH The length in bytes of the Router Public Key. Does not include pad that may follow Router Public Key field. ROUTER ROLE Router (R=1), Area Border Router (ABR=2), Autonomous System Border Router (ASBR=4), ABR and ASBR (ABR- ASBR=6). #NET RANGES The number of network ranges that follow. A network range is defined to be an IP Address and an Address Mask. This list of ranges defines the addresses that the Router is permitted to advertise in its Router Links LSA. Valid values are 0-255. If there are 0 ranges the router cannot advertise anything. This is not generally useful. One range with address=0 and mask=0 will allow a router to advertise any address. IP ADDRESS & ADDRESS MASK Define a range of addresses that this router may advertise. Each is a 32 bit value. One range with address=0 and mask=0 will allow a router to advertise any address. ROUTER PUBLIC KEY A key that can be used to verify the signatures produced by this router. The internal format for the Router Public Key is signature algorithm dependent. A pad is added to the end of the Router Public Key field to allow the next field to begin on a (4 byte) word boundary. The format used for an RSA-MD5 public key is defined in section 3.5 of RFC2065 [10]. CERTIFICATION The Trusted Entity's signature of the certified data. This signature can be verified with the TE public key identified by TE Id and TE Key Id given in this packet. The length of the certification depends on the key size, and is stored in the PKLSA Cert Length field. A pad is added to the end of the Certification to allow the next field to begin on a (4 byte) word boundary. The format used for an RSA-MD5 signature is defined in section 4.1.2 of RFC2065 [10]. 7.3 Signed LSA A signed LSA is an OSPF LSA with signature data and a digital signature attached. The first bit of the LSA Type field is set to indicate the presence of a signature. The signature follows the LSA Data. Signature length and id fields are positioned at the end of the signed LSA. ANY SIGNED LSA 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | LS Age | Options | LS Type | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Link State ID | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Advertising Router | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | LS Sequence Number | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | LS Checksum | Length | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | LSA Data / / ... / +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Signature / +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ | Rtr Key Id | TE Id | Sign Length | +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-*-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ LS AGE Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. OPTIONS Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. LS TYPE Standard LSA Type with the first bit set to indicate the presence of security data and a signature. This creates a new signed LSA type for each existing type. LINK STATE ID Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. ADVERTISING ROUTER Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. LS SEQUENCE NUMBER Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. LS CHECKSUM Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. Checksum does not cover the signature. LENGTH Defined in OSPF RFC [3]. Length does include the Signature and security related fields at the end of the LSA. SIGNATURE The advertising router's signature of this LSA. The signature covers the LSA header and data starting with the LSA header options field and ending with the Trusted Entity certification field. For sign and verify, the last three fields (Rtr Key Id, TE Id, Sign Length) are appended to the Certificate. When complete, the signature is inserted between the Certification and the Rtr Key Id. There are two exceptions to this coverage: 1) If the LSA was generated with an age=MaxAge, then the signature begins with the age field (see section 3.3). 2) The checksum in the LSA Header is set to zero for the computation & verification of the signature. A pad is added to the end of the signature to allow the next field to begin on a (4 byte) word boundary. The format used for an RSA-MD5 signature is defined in section 4.1.2 of RFC2065 [10]. RTR KEY ID Used to identify the router key used to sign this LSA. The combination of (TE Id, Rtr Id, Rtr Key Id) uniquely identifies a particular router key at a given time, and can be used to look up the PKLSA for the router key needed to verify this Signed LSA. A number between 1-250. 0 reserved for null. 251-255 reserved for future needs. TE ID The id of the Trusted Entity that produced the certificate. TE Id must uniquely identify one TE in the AS. A number between 1-250. 0 reserved for null. 251-255 reserved for future needs. SIGN LENGTH The length in bytes of the Signature. Does not include pad that may follow Signature. 8. Configuration Information Trusted Entity Information Set: (one per Trusted Entity used by this router) Trusted Entity ID - TE Id Identifies the Trusted Entity within the AS (defined in 7.2). Trusted Entity Key Id - TE Key Id Identifies the particular key for this Trusted Entity (defined in 7.2). Trusted Entity Public Key A public key for this Trusted Entity. The format used for an RSA-MD5 public key is defined in section 3.5 of RFC2065 [10]. Signature Algorithm < and optional parameters > The signature algorithm for the public key (defined in 7.2). Router Information Set: (at least one for the router) Router Private Key The router's private key that goes with the public key in the certificate following. The format used for the private key depends on the crypto package used by your implementation. This key is not transmitted as part of this design. Our implementation uses the private key format compatible with RSAREF [9]. Router Certificate (format in 7.2). Timing Intervals: Trusted Entity Key Distribution Interval (TE_KEY_DIST_INT) The period of time, in seconds, needed to get a TE public key installed on all the routers in the TE's scope. Maximum Transit Delay (MAX_TRANSIT_DELAY) The maximum period of time, in seconds, that it should take for an LSA to reach all the routers in the AS. Router Information per attached Area: Environment flag Signed=1, Unsigned=0 9. Remaining Vulnerabilities Note that with this mechanism, one router can still distribute incorrect data in the information for which it itself is responsible. Consequently, an autonomous system employing digital signatures with this mechanism will not be completely invulnerable to routing disruptions from a single router. For example, the area border routers and autonomous system border routers will still be able to inject incorrect routing information. Also, any single internal router can be incorrect in the routing information it originates about its own links. 9.1. Area Border Routers Even with the design proposed here, the area border routers can inject incorrect routing information into their attached areas about the backbone and the other areas in Summary LSA's. They can also inject incorrect routing information into the backbone about their attached area. Because all the area border routers in one area work from the same database of LSA's received in their common area, it would be possible for the area border routers to corroborate each other. Any area border router for an area could double check the Summary LSA's received over the backbone from other ABR's from the area, and could double check the Summary LSA's flooded through the area from the other area border routers. The other routers in the area or backbone should be warned of a failure of this check. The warning could be a signed message from the area border router detecting the failure, flooded in the usual mechanism. Another possibility would be that the area border routers in an area could originate multiple sets of Summary LSA's -- one for itself containing its own information and one for each of the area border routers in the area containing the information each of them should originate. Each router in the area or backbone could then determine for itself whether the area border routers agreed. This distribution of information but coordination of processing is in keeping with the paradigm of link state protocols, where information and processing is duplicated in each router. Both alternatives mean much additional processing and additional message transmission, over and above the additional processing required for signature generation and verification. Because the vulnerability is isolated to a few points in each area, because the source of incorrect information is detectable (in those situations where the incorrect information is spotted) and because the protection is costly, we have not added this protection to this design. 9.2. Internal Routers The internal routers can be incorrect about information they themselves originate. A router could announce an incorrect metric for a valid link. There is no way to guard against this, but the damage would be small and localized even if the router is announcing that the link is up when it is down or vice versa. A router could announce a connection that does not in fact exist. If a router announces a non-existent connection to a transit network, the OSPF Dijkstra computation will not consider the connection without a similar announcement from another router at the other "end". Therefore, no damage would result (above network impact to transmit and store the incorrect information) without the cooperation of another router. A router could also announce a connection to a stub network or a host route that does not exist. The Dijkstra computation can not perform the same check for a similar announcement from the other "end", because no other end exists. This is a vulnerability. A faulty router announcing a nonexistent connection to a stub network or host could result in the faulty router receiving IP packets bound for that network or host. Unless the faulty router then forwarded the packets to the correct destination by source routing, the failure of packet delivery could expose the incorrect routing. To exploit the vulnerability deliberately, the faulty router would have to be able to handle and pass on the received traffic for the incorrectly announced destination. Furthermore, if the incorrect routing were discovered, the signatures on the routing information would identify the faulty router as the source of the incorrect information. Finally, this design checks router advertisements against allowed address ranges certified by a trusted entity. A faulty router could announce nonexistent host or stub network routes, but only to addresses within its allowed ranges. 9.3. Autonomous System Border Routers The autonomous system boundary routers can produce incorrect routing information in the external routes information they originate. There is no way to double check or corroborate this information, as there is with area border routers. No authority within an autonomous system exists to authorize the networks an autonomous system boundary router could announce, as is the case for the internal networks an internal router could announce. Consequently, the autonomous system boundary routers remain a unprotected vulnerability. With this in mind, special care should be taken to protect the autonomous system boundary routers with other means. 10. Security Considerations This entire memo is about security considerations. 11. References [1] Finn, Gregory G., "Reducing the Vulnerability of Dynamic Computer Networks," ISI Research Report ISI/RR-88-201, University of Southern California Information Sciences Institute, Marina del Rey, California, June 1988. [2] Kumar,B and Crowcroft,J., "Integrating Security in Inter-Domain Routing Protocols", Computer Communications Review, Vol 23, No. 5, October 1993. [3] Moy, J., "OSPF Version 2," RFC 1583, Proteon, Inc., March 1994. [4] Perlman, R., "Network Layer Protocols with Byzantine Robustness", Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT, August 1988. [5] Perlman, R., "Interconnections: Bridges and Routers", Addison-Wesley, Reading, Mass., 1992. [6] Schneier, B., "Applied Cryptography: Protocols, Algorithms, and Source Code in C," John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, 1994. [7] Steenstrup, M., "Inter-Domain Policy Routing Protocol Specification: Version 1", RFC 1479, BBN Systems and Technologies, July 1993. [9] PKCS #1: RSA Encryption Standard, RSA Data Security, Inc., June 1991, Version 1.4. [10] Eastlake D. & Kaufman C., "Domain Name System Security Extensions", RFC2065, January 1997. [11] Moy J., "OSPF Version 2", Cascade Communications Corp, Work In Progress. 12. Authors' Addresses Sandra Murphy murphy@tis.com Madelyn Badger mrb@tis.com Brian Wellington bwelling@tis.com Trusted Information Systems 3060 Washington Road Glenwood, MD 21738