ftp.cc.uoc.gr
rfc5806
This is a purely informative rendering of an RFC that includes verified errata. This rendering may not be used as a reference.

The following 'Verified' errata have been incorporated in this document: EID 3081, EID 3082, EID 3083, EID 3177, EID 3178
Independent Submission                                           S. Levy
Request for Comments: 5806                                 Cisco Systems
Category: Historic                                        M. Mohali, Ed.
ISSN: 2070-1721                                              Orange Labs
                                                              March 2010


                      Diversion Indication in SIP

Abstract

   This RFC, which contains the text of an Internet Draft that was
   submitted originally to the SIP Working Group, is being published now
   for the historical record and to provide a reference for later
   Informational RFCs.  The original Abstract follows.

   This document proposes an extension to the Session Initiation
   Protocol (SIP).  This extension provides the ability for the called
   SIP user agent to identify from whom the call was diverted and why
   the call was diverted.  The extension defines a general header,
   Diversion, which conveys the diversion information from other SIP
   user agents and proxies to the called user agent.

   This extension allows enhanced support for various features,
   including Unified Messaging, Third-Party Voicemail, and Automatic
   Call Distribution (ACD).  SIP user agents and SIP proxies that
   receive diversion information may use this as supplemental
   information for feature invocation decisions.

Status of This Memo

   This document is not an Internet Standards Track specification; it is
   published for the historical record.

   This document defines a Historic Document for the Internet community.
   This is a contribution to the RFC Series, independently of any other
   RFC stream.  The RFC Editor has chosen to publish this document at
   its discretion and makes no statement about its value for
   implementation or deployment.  Documents approved for publication by
   the RFC Editor are not a candidate for any level of Internet
   Standard; see Section 2 of RFC 5741.

   Information about the current status of this document, any errata,
   and how to provide feedback on it may be obtained at
   http://www.rfc-editor.org/info/rfc5806.

IESG Note

   This document contains an early proposal to the IETF SIP Working
   Group that was not chosen for standardization.  Discussions on the
   topic resulted in the informational RFC 3325, "Private Extensions to
   the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) for Asserted Identity within
   Trusted Networks", and the standard solution that was chosen can be
   found in RFC 4244, "An Extension to the Session Initiation Protocol
   (SIP) for Request History Information".

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (c) 2010 IETF Trust and the persons identified as the
   document authors.  All rights reserved.

   This document is subject to BCP 78 and the IETF Trust's Legal
   Provisions Relating to IETF Documents
   (http://trustee.ietf.org/license-info) in effect on the date of
   publication of this document.  Please review these documents
   carefully, as they describe your rights and restrictions with respect
   to this document.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction ....................................................4
   2. Terminology .....................................................4
      2.1. Requirements Language ......................................4
      2.2. Definitions ................................................4
      2.3. Abbreviations ..............................................5
   3. Overview ........................................................5
      3.1. When Is the Diversion Header Used? .........................6
   4. Extension Syntax ................................................6
   5. Detailed Semantics ..............................................7
      5.1. UAS Behavior ...............................................7
      5.2. UAC Behavior ...............................................7
      5.3. Redirect Server Behavior ...................................7
      5.4. Proxy Server Behavior ......................................7
   6. Examples Using Diversion Header .................................8
      6.1. Call Forward Unconditional .................................8
      6.2. Call Forward on Busy ......................................13
      6.3. Call Forward on No-Answer .................................17
      6.4. Call Forward on Unavailable ...............................21
      6.5. Multiple Diversions .......................................24
   7. Security Considerations ........................................27
   8. Further Examples ...............................................27
      8.1. Night Service/Automatic Call Distribution (ACD)
           Using Diversion Header ....................................27
      8.2. Voicemail Service Using Diversion Header ..................36
      8.3. Questions and Answers on Alternative Approaches ...........41
 9. Mapping ISUP/ISDN Redirection Information to SIP
      Diversion Header ...............................................42
      9.1. Mapping ISUP/ISDN Diversion Reason Codes ..................42
      9.2. Mapping ISUP Redirection Information to SIP
           Diversion Header ..........................................43
      9.3. Mapping ISDN Redirection Information to SIP
           Diversion Header ..........................................47
      9.4. Information Loss in SIP to ISUP/ISDN Translation ..........52
   10. Contributors ..................................................53
   11. Acknowledgements ..............................................53
   12. Normative References ..........................................53

1.  Introduction

   This RFC, which contains the text of an Internet Draft that was
   submitted originally to the SIP Working Group, is being published now
   for the historical record and to provide a reference for later
   Informational RFCs.

   In the legacy telephony network, redirection information is passed
   through the network in ISDN/ISUP (ISDN User Part) signaling messages.
   This information is used by various service providers and business
   applications to support enhanced features for the end user.

   An analogous mechanism of providing redirection information would
   enable such enhanced features for SIP users.

   The Diversion header allows implementation of feature logic based on
   from whom the call was diverted.

2.  Terminology

2.1.  Requirements Language

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in [RFC2119].

2.2.  Definitions

   diversion:

      A change to the ultimate destination endpoint of a request.  A
      change in the Request-URI of a request that was not caused by a
      routing decision.  This is also sometimes called a deflection or
      redirection.

      A diversion can occur when the "user" portion of the Request-URI
      is changed for a reason other than expansion or translation.

      A diversion can occur when only the "host" portion of the Request-
      URI has changed if the change was due to a non-routing decision.

   divertor:

      The entity that diverted the call.

   recursing:

      A SIP proxy or user agent that handles a received or internally
      generated 3xx response by forking new request(s) itself.

   non-recursing:

      A SIP proxy or user agent that handles a received or internally
      generated 3xx response by forwarding it upstream.

2.3.  Abbreviations

   CFUNC: Call Forward Unconditional

   CFTOD: Call Forward Time-of-Day

   CFB:   Call Forward on Busy

   CFNA:  Call Forward on No Answer

   CFUNV: Call Forward Unavailable

   ACD:   Automatic Call Distribution

3.  Overview

   In order to implement certain third-party features such as Third-
   Party Voicemail and Automatic Call Distribution (ACD) applications,
   diversion information needs to be given to the called third party so
   that he may respond to the caller intelligently.  In these
   situations, the party receiving a diverted call needs answers for two
   questions:

   Question 1: From whom was the request diverted?

   Question 2: Why was the request diverted?

   This document proposes usage of the Diversion header to answer these
   questions for the party receiving the diverted call.

   Insertion of the previous Request-URI (before the diversion occurred)
   into the Diversion header answers question 1.

   Insertion of the "reason" tag into the Diversion header (by the
   divertor) answers question 2.

3.1.  When Is the Diversion Header Used?

   The Diversion header SHOULD be added when a SIP proxy server, SIP
   redirect server, or SIP user agent changes the ultimate endpoint that
   will receive the call.

   Diversion information SHOULD NOT be added for normal call routing
   changes to the Request-URI.  Thus, the Diversion header is not added
   when features such as speed dial change the Request-URI.

   When a diversion occurs, a Diversion header SHOULD be added to the
   forwarded request or forwarded 3xx response.  The Diversion header
   MUST contain the Request-URI of the request prior to the diversion.
   The Diversion header SHOULD contain a reason that the diversion
   occurred.

   Existing Diversion headers received in an incoming request MUST NOT
   be removed or changed in forwarded requests.

   Existing Diversion headers received in an incoming response MUST NOT
   be removed or changed in the forwarded response.

   A Diversion header is added when features such as call forwarding or
   call deflection change the Request-URI.

4.  Extension Syntax

   The syntax of the Diversion header is:

   Diversion = "Diversion" HCOLON diversion-params *(COMMA diversion-params) 
diversion-params    = name-addr *(SEMI (diversion-reason /
                      diversion-counter / diversion-limit /
                      diversion-privacy / diversion-screen /
                      diversion-extension))

EID 3177 (Verified) is as follows:

Section: 4

Original Text:

Diversion = "Diversion" ":" 1# (name-addr *( ";" diversion_params ))
diversion-params = diversion-reason | diversion-counter |
                   diversion-limit | diversion-privacy |
                   diversion-screen | diversion-extension

Corrected Text:

Diversion = "Diversion" HCOLON diversion-params *(COMMA diversion-params)
diversion-params    = name-addr *(SEMI (diversion-reason /
                      diversion-counter / diversion-limit /
                      diversion-privacy / diversion-screen /
                      diversion-extension))
Notes:
The original text did not comply with the format defined by RFC 4485 and RFC 3261. It also did not indicate where to find the #rule (such as within RFC 2543). Thus the ABNF for Diversion should either be modified or RFC 2543 should be referenced to help interoperability. The proposed new ABNF was provided by RFC 6044; it also changes ";" to SEMI which addresses the related LWS ambiguity concerning if RFC 3261 or RFC 2543 LWS rules should be followed.
diversion-reason = "reason" "=" ( "unknown" | "user-busy" | "no-answer" | "unavailable" | "unconditional" | "time-of-day" | "do-not-disturb" | "deflection" | "follow-me" | "out-of-service" | "away" | token | quoted-string ) diversion-counter = "counter" "=" 1*2DIGIT diversion-limit = "limit" "=" 1*2DIGIT diversion-privacy = "privacy" "=" ( "full" | "name" | "uri" | "off" | token | quoted-string ) diversion-screen = "screen" "=" ( "yes" | "no" | token | quoted-string ) diversion-extension = token ["=" (token | quoted-string)] The following is an extension of tables 4 and 5 in [RFC3261] for the Diversion header: where enc. e-e ACK BYE CAN INV OPT REG _____________________________________________________________ Diversion R h - - - o - - Diversion 3xx h - - - o - - 5. Detailed Semantics 5.1. UAS Behavior A SIP User Agent Service (UAS) that receives a request and returns a 3xx SHOULD add a Diversion header containing the previous Request-URI and the reason for the diversion. 5.2. UAC Behavior A SIP UAC that receives a 3xx containing a Diversion header SHOULD copy the Diversion header into each downstream forked request that resulted from the 3xx. 5.3. Redirect Server Behavior A SIP redirect server that receives a request and returns a 3xx containing a Contact that diverts the request to a different endpoint SHOULD add a Diversion header containing the Request-URI from the incoming request and the reason for the diversion. 5.4. Proxy Server Behavior A non-recursing SIP proxy that receives a 3xx containing a Diversion header SHOULD forward the 3xx containing the Diversion header upstream unchanged. A SIP proxy that receives a request and invokes a feature that changes the Request-URI of the forwarded request in order to divert the request to a different endpoint SHOULD add a Diversion header containing the Request-URI from the incoming request and the reason for the diversion. A SIP proxy that receives a request and returns a 3xx containing a Contact that diverts the request to a different endpoint SHOULD add a Diversion header containing the Request-URI from the incoming request and the reason for the diversion. 5.4.1. Proxy Logic for Diversion Header if (pdu.is_request()) { if (request-URI is changed due to a called feature) { if (proxy.is_recursing()) { Add the Diversion header (indicating the reason that the call has been diverted) to the downstream forwarded request(s). } else { Add the Diversion header (indicating the reason that the call has been diverted) to the upstream forwarded 3xx response. } } } else if (pdu.is_response()) { if (pdu.is_3xx()) { if (proxy.is_recursing()) { Copy Diversion header into forwarded INVITE(s). } else { Forward response upstream. } } } 6. Examples Using Diversion Header There are several implementations of call forwarding features that can be implemented by either recursing or non-recursing SIP proxies or SIP user agents. A SIP proxy or user agent that generates or forwards 3xxs upstream is non-recursing. A SIP proxy or user agent that handles received (or internally generated) 3xxs itself is recursing. The following examples illustrate usage of the Diversion header for some of the variants of recursing and non-recursing proxies and user agents. 6.1. Call Forward Unconditional Usage of the Diversion header is shown below for several variant implementations of Call Forward Unconditional. 6.1.1. Network Call Forward Unconditional (P2 Recursing) In this message flow, the call would normally be routed to Bob@B. However, Proxy 2 (P2) recursively implements Call Forward Unconditional (CFUNC) to Carol@C. +------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNC->Carol@C | +------+-----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------->| | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------| | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.1.2. Network Call Forward Unconditional (P1 Non-Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward Unconditional (CFUNC) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is non- recursing. +------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNC->Carol@C | +------+-----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C non-recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------------------------------------->| | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------------------------------------| | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.1.3. Network Call Forward Unconditional (P1 Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward Unconditional (CFUNC) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is recursing. +------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNC->Carol@C | +------+-----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C---------------------->| | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | |<-200----------------------------------| | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.1.4. Endpoint Call Forward Unconditional (P1 Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, user agent server B (B) non-recursively implements Call Forward Unconditional (CFUNC) to Carol@C. Proxy 2 (P2) is non-recursing. Proxy 1 (P1) is recursing. +-----------------------+ | Bob@B: CFUNC->Carol@C | +------+----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | |--INV Bob@B--->| | | | | | | | | |<-302----------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | |--ACK--------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------------------------>| | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | |<-200------------------------------------| | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------------------------------------------------->| | | | | | | | | | | 6.2. Call Forward on Busy Usage of the Diversion header is shown below for several variant implementations of Call Forward on Busy. 6.2.1. Network Call Forward on Busy (P2 Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) recursively implements Call Forward on Busy (CFB) to Carol@C. +----------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFB->Carol@C | +------+---------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | |<-486--------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------->| | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------| | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.2.2. Network Call Forward on Busy (P1 Non-Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward on Busy (CFB) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is non-recursing. +----------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFB->Carol@C | +------+---------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C non-recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | |<-486--------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------------------------------------->| | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------------------------------------| | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.2.3. Network Call Forward on Busy (P1 Recursing, P2 Non-Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward on Busy (CFB) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is recursing. +----------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFB->Carol@C | +------+---------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | |<-486--------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C---------------------->| | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |<-200----------------------------------| | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.2.4. Endpoint Call Forward on Busy (P1 Recursing, P2 Non-Recursing) In this message flow, user agent server B (B) non-recursively implements Call Forward on Busy (CFB) to Carol@C. Proxy 2 (P2) is non-recursing. Proxy 1 (P1) is recursing. +---------------------+ | Bob@B: CFB->Carol@C | +------+--------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | |<-302--------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |--ACK------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C---------------------->| | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason-user-busy | | | | | | | | |<-200----------------------------------| | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.3. Call Forward on No-Answer Usage of the Diversion header is shown below for several variant implementations of Call Forward on No-Answer. 6.3.1. Network Call Forward on No-Answer (P2 Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) recursively implements Call Forward on No Answer (CFNA) to Carol@C. +-----------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFNA->Carol@C | +------+----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | |<-180--------| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | timeout | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------->| | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------| | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.3.2. Network Call Forward on No-Answer (P1 Non-Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward on No Answer (CFNA) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is non- recursing. +-----------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFNA->Carol@C | +------+----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C non-recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | |<-180--------| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | timeout | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------------------------------------->| | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------------------------------------| | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | 6.3.3. Network Call Forward on No Answer (P1 Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward on No Answer (CFNA) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is recursing. +-----------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFNA->Carol@C | +------+----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | |<-180--------| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | timeout | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C---------------------->| | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |<-200----------------------------------| | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.3.4. Endpoint Call Forward on No-Answer (P1 Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing, B Non-Recursing) In this message flow, user agent server B (B) non-recursively implements Call Forward on No Answer (CFNA) to Carol@C. Proxy 2 (P2) is non-recursing. Proxy 1 (P1) is recursing. +----------------------+ | Bob@B: CFNA->Carol@C | +------+---------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | timeout | | | |<-302--------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |--ACK------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C---------------------->| | | Diversion: Bob@B | | | | ;reason-no-answer | | | | | | | | |<-200----------------------------------| | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | 6.4. Call Forward on Unavailable Usage of the Diversion header is shown below for several variant implementations of Call Forward on Unavailable. 6.4.1. Network Call Forward on Unavailable (P2 Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) recursively implements Call Forward on Unavailable (CFUNV) to Carol@C. +------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNV->Carol@C | +------+-----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | |<-100---------| | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | |<-100---------| | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | ... | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | timeout | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------->| | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unavailable | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------| | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.4.2. Network Call Forward on Unavailable (P1 Non-Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward on Unavailable (CFUNV) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is non- recursing. +------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNV->Carol@C | +------+-----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C non-recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | |<-100---------| | | | | | | | |<-100---------| | | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | ... | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | timeout | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unavailable | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unavailable | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C------------------------------------->| | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unavailable | | | | | | | | |<-200-------------------------------------------------| | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.4.3. Network Call Forward on Unavailable (P1 Recursing, P2 Non- Recursing) In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) non-recursively implements Call Forward on Unavailable (CFUNV) to Carol@C. Proxy 1 (P1) is recursing. +------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNV->Carol@C | +------+-----------------+ \ \ A P1 P2 B C recursing non-recursing | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | |<-100---------| | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | |<-100---------| | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | | ... | | | | |--INV Bob@B->| | | | timeout | | | |<-302---------| | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unavailable | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C---------------------->| | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unavailable | | | | | | | | |<-200----------------------------------| | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | |--ACK------------------------------------------------>| | | | | | | | | | | 6.5. Multiple Diversions Usage of the Diversion header when multiple diversions occur are shown the following two examples. 6.5.1. Call Forward Unconditional and Call Forward Busy In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) implements Call Forward Unconditional (CFUNC) to Carol@C. C then implements Call Forward on Busy (CFB) to 5551234@D. P2 is non-recursing. P1 is recursing. C is non-recursing. +------------------------+ +-------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNC->Carol@C | | Carol@C: CFB->5551234@D | +---------------+--------+ +--------+----------------+ \ \ \ \ A P1 P2 B C D recursing non-recursing non-recursing | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | | |<-302---------| | | | | | Contact: Carol@C | | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | | | |--ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | | | |--INVITE Carol@C---------------------->| | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | | | |<-302----------------------------------| | | | Contact: 5551234@D | | | | | Diversion: Carol@C | | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | ;privacy=full | | |
EID 3178 (Verified) is as follows:

Section: 6.5.1

Original Text:

privacy="full"

Corrected Text:

privacy=full
Notes:
The example incorrectly adds quotes to full. The quotes add confusion since full was explicitly defined to not use quotes. Similar quoting issues exist within other examples; see sections 6.5.2, 9.2.5, 9.2.6, 9.3.5, and 9.3.6.
| | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | | | |--ACK--------------------------------->| | | | | | | | | |--INVITE 5551234@D------------------------------->| | | Diversion: Carol@C | | | | | ;reason=user-busy | | | | | ;privacy="full" | | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | | | |<-200---------------------------------------------| | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | | | |--ACK----------------------------------------------------------->| | | | | | | | | | | | | 6.5.2. Call Forward Unconditional and Call Forward No Answer In this message flow, Proxy 2 (P2) implements Call Forward Unconditional (CFUNC) to Carol@C. (P2 would normally have routed the call to B). C then implements Call Forward on No Answer (CFNA) to 5551234@D. P2 is recursing. C is recursing. +------------------------+ +--------------------------+ | Bob@P2: CFUNC->Carol@C | | Carol@C: CFNA->5551234@D | +------------------+-----+ +-----+--------------------+ \ \ \ \ A P1 P2 B C D recursing recursing | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | | | |--INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | | | |--INV Carol@C->| | | | | Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | ;reason=unconditional | | | | | | | | | |<--180---------| | | | | | | | | |<-180---------| | | | | | | | | | |<-180---------| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | timeout | | | | | |--INV 5551234@D->| | | | | |Diversion: Carol@C | | | | | ;reason=no-answer | | | | | ;privacy="full" | | | | |Diversion: Bob@P2 | | | | | ;reason= unconditional | | | | | | | | | | |<-200------------| | | | | | | | | | |<-200----------| | | | | | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | | | | |<-200---------| | | | | | | | | | | | | |--ACK--------------------------------------------------------->| | | | | | | | 7. Security Considerations There are some privacy considerations when using the Diversion header. Usage of the Diversion header implies that the diverting UAS trusts the diverted-to UAS. Usage of the Diversion header by SIP proxies or SIP user agents can cause information leakage of route information and called information to untrusted SIP proxies and untrusted callers in upstream 3xxs. Leakage of this information can be mitigated by having a recursing trusted upstream proxy server. For a SIP network architecture where all proxies are required to be non-recursive, Diversion header hiding may be considered necessary in order to prevent leakage of route information to the caller. To accomplish Diversion header hiding, a trusted upstream proxy would add a Record-Route header and use a secret key to encrypt the contents of the Diversion header in 3xxs that are forwarded upstream. On receipt of re-INVITEs, the proxy would decrypt the contents of the Diversion header (using its secret key) and forward the INVITE. There is no currently defined interaction of the Diversion and Hide headers. Question: Should there be? 8. Further Examples Only the relevant headers have been included in the following examples. The contents of the Session Description Protocols (SDPs) have also been omitted. 8.1. Night Service/Automatic Call Distribution (ACD) Using Diversion Header In the following two message flows, two separate companies, WeSellPizza.com and WeSellFlowers.com, have contracted with a third company, NightService.com to provide nighttime support for their incoming voice calls. In the first flow, Alice calls out for pizza. In the second flow, Alice calls for roses. In both instances, the same night service company (and receptionist, Carol) answers the call. However, because the Diversion header is used, Carol is able to customize her greeting to the caller. +-------------------------------------+ | WeSellPizza@P2: CFTOD->nightserv@P3 | +------------+------------------------+ \ \ UAC P1 P2 P3 UAS1 (WeSellPizza.com) (NightService.com) (ACD) | [1] | | | | |-INV pizza@P1->| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | [2] INVITE WeSellPizza@P2 | | | |------------->| | | | | | | | | | | [3] | | | | |-INV nightserv@P3->| | | | | Diversion: WeSellPizza@P2 | | | | ;reason=time-of-day | | | | | | | | | | [4] | | | | |-INV Carol@uas1-->| | | | Diversion: WeSellPizza@P2 | | | | ;reason=time-of-day | | | | | | | | | |<-[5] 200---------| | | |<-[6] 200----------| | | |<-[7] 200-----| | | |<-[8] 200------| | | | | | | | | |--[9] ACK----------------------------------------------------------->| | | | | | |<=========================================="Hello, WeSellPizza"======| | | | | | | | | | | Alice calls for pizza. [1] SIP UAC to SIP proxy server 1: INVITE sip:pizza@p1.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:pizza@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp The ISP's originating proxy translated the keyword pizza to the company WeSellPizza.com [2] SIP proxy server 1 to SIP proxy server 2 (WeSellPizza.com): INVITE sip:WeSellPizza@p2.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:pizza@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp It's after midnight and the pizza people are in bed. Fortunately, WeSellPizza.com has contracted with NightService.com to answer their nighttime calls. Thus, P2 implements CFTOD to NightService.com. [3] SIP proxy server 2 (WeSellPizza.com) to SIP proxy server 3 (NightService.com): INVITE sip:NightService@p3.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p2.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:pizza@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:WeSellPizza@p2.isp.com> ;reason=time-of-day Content-Type: application/sdp Carol is available to receive the incoming call. [4] SIP proxy server 3 (NightService.com) to UAS1 (Carol): INVITE sip:carol@uas1.nightservice.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p3.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p2.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:pizza@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:WeSellPizza@p2.isp.com> ;reason=time-of-day Content-Type: application/sdp The ACD keys off the Diversion header to pull up the WeSellPizza FAQ on Carol's web browser. [5] UAS1 to SIP proxy server 3: SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p3.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p2.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: carol@uas1.nightservice.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:pizza@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [6] SIP proxy server 3 to SIP proxy server 2: SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p2.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: carol@uas1.nightservice.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:pizza@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [7] SIP proxy server 2 to SIP proxy server 1: SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: carol@uas1.nightservice.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:pizza@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [8] SIP proxy server 1 to UAC SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: carol@uas1.nightservice.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:pizza@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [9] SIP UAC to UAS1: ACK sip:uas1.nightservice.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:pizza@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE The RTP flows begin and Carol answers "Hello, WeSellPizza. How may I help you?" +---------------------------------------+ | WeSellFlowers@P4: CFTOD->nightserv@P3 | +-------------+-------------------------+ \ \ UAC P1 P4 P3 UAS1 (WeSellFlowers.com) (NightService.com) (ACD) | [1] | | | | |-INV roses@P1->| | | | | | | | | | | [2] INVITE WeSellFlowers@P4 | | | |--------------->| | | | | | | | | | [3] | | | | |<-302-----------| | | | | Contact: nightservice@P3 | | | | Diversion: WeSellFlowers@P4 | | | | ;reason=time-of-day | | | | | | | | |--[4] ACK------>| | | | | | | | | | [5] | | | | |-INVITE nightservice@P3------------>| | | | Diversion: WeSellFlowers@P4 | | | | ;reason=time-of-day | | | | | | | | | | | [6] | | | | -INV Carol@uas1----->| | | | Diversion: WeSellFlowers@P4 | | | ;reason=time-of-day | | | | | | | |<-[7] 200------------| | |<-[8] 200---------------------------| | |<-[9] 200------| | | | | | | | | |--[10] ACK---------------------------------------------------------->| | | | | | |<======================================="Hello, WeSellFlowers"=======| | | | | | | | | | | Alice calls for roses. [1] SIP UAC to SIP proxy server 1: INVITE sip:roses@p1.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:roses@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp The ISP's originating proxy translated the keyword roses to the company WeSellFlowers.com [2] SIP proxy server 1 to SIP proxy server 4 (WeSellFlowers.com): INVITE sip:WeSellFlowers@p4.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:roses@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp It's now 1 a.m. and the florists are also in bed. Fortunately, WeSellFlowers.com has contracted with NightService.com to answer their nighttime calls, too. Thus, P4 implements CFTOD to NightService.com. [3] SIP proxy server 4 (WeSellFlowers.com) to SIP proxy server 1 (NightService.com): SIP/2.0 302 Moved Temporarily Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: NightService@p3.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:roses@p1.isp.com>;tag=p4 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:WeSellFlowers@p4.isp.com> ;reason=time-of-day [4] SIP proxy server 1 to SIP proxy server 4 (WeSellFlowers.com): ACK sip:uas1.nightservice.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:roses@p1.isp.com>;tag=p4 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE [5] SIP proxy server 1 (WeSellFlowers.com) to SIP proxy server 3 (NightService.com): INVITE sip:NightService@p3.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:roses@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:WeSellFlowers@p4.isp.com> ;reason=time-of-day Content-Type: application/sdp Carol is available to receive the incoming call. [6] SIP proxy server 3 (NightService.com) to UAS1 (Carol): INVITE sip:carol@uas1.nightservice.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p3.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:roses@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:WeSellFlowers@p4.isp.com> ;reason=time-of-day Content-Type: application/sdp The ACD keys off the Diversion header to pull up the WeSellFlowers FAQ on Carol's web browser. [7] SIP UAS1 to SIP proxy server 3: SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p3.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: carol@uas1.nightservice.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:roses@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [8] SIP proxy server 3 to SIP proxy server 1: SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: carol@uas1.nightservice.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:roses@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [9] SIP proxy server 1 to UAC SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: carol@uas1.nightservice.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:roses@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [10] SIP UAC to SIP UAS1: ACK sip:uas1.nightservice.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:roses@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE The RTP flows begin and Carol answers "Hello, WeSellFlowers. How may I help you?" 8.2. Voicemail Service Using Diversion Header Bob has contracted his Voicemail to a third-party company, Voicemail.com. In this message flow, Bob has hit the Do-Not-Disturb button on his phone. The Do-Not-Disturb functionality of Bob's phone is configured to CFUNC (Call Forward Unconditional) to voicemail@isp.com. Because the Diversion header is used, Voicemail.com is able to place the incoming call into Bob's voice mailbox. +---------------------------------------------+ | Bob@UAS1: CFDoNotDisturb->voicemail@isp.com | +--------------------------------------+------+ \ \ UAC1 P1 P2 UAS1 UAS2 Voicemail.com | | | | | |--[1] INV Bob@P1->| | | | | | | | | | |--[2] INV Bob@P2->| | | | | | | | | | [3] INV Bob@uas1->| | | | | | | | | [4] <- 302-------| | | | Contact: voicemail@isp.com | | | Diversion: Bob@uas1 | | | ;reason=do-not-disturb | | | | | | | | |[5] ACK------>| | | | | | | | |<-[6] 302---------| | | | | Contact: voicemail@isp.com | | | | Diversion: Bob@uas1 | | | | ;reason=do-not-disturb | | | | | | | | |--[7] ACK-------->| | | |<-[8] 302---------| | | | | Contact: voicemail@isp.com | | | | Diversion: Bob@uas1 | | | | ;reason=do-not-disturb | | | | | | | | |--[9] ACK-------->| | | | | | | | | |--[10] INVITE voicemail@isp.com------------------------------->| | Diversion: Bob@uas1 | | | | ;reason=do-not-disturb | | | | | | | | |<--[11] 200----------------------------------------------------| | | | | | |---[12] ACK--------------------------------------------------->| | | | | | | | | | | Alice calls Bob. [1] SIP UAC to SIP proxy server 1: INVITE sip:Bob@p1.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:Bob@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp The ISP's originating proxy routes the request to proxy 2 (P2). [2] SIP proxy server 1 to SIP proxy server 2: INVITE sip:Bob@p2.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:Bob@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [3] SIP proxy server 2 to UAS1 (Bob's SIP phone): INVITE sip:Bob@uas1.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p2.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:Bob@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp Since Bob had hit the Do-Not-Disturb button on his SIP phone, Bob's phone forwards the call to his voicemail service. [4] User agent server 1 (UAS1) to SIP proxy server 2 (P2) SIP/2.0 302 Moved Temporarily Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p2.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: Voicemail@isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:Bob@uas1.isp.com> ;reason=do-not-disturb [5] SIP proxy server 2 to UAS1 (Bob's SIP phone): ACK sip:Bob@uas1.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p2.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE [6] SIP proxy server 2 (P2) to SIP proxy server 1 (P1): SIP/2.0 302 Moved Temporarily Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: Voicemail@isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:Bob@uas1.isp.com> ;reason=do-not-disturb [7] SIP proxy server 1 to SIP proxy server 2: ACK sip:Bob@p2.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP p1.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE [8] SIP proxy server 1 (P1) to UAC (alice-pc): SIP/2.0 302 Moved Temporarily Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: Voicemail@isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:Bob@uas1.isp.com> ;reason=do-not-disturb [9] SIP UAC to SIP proxy server 1: ACK sip:Bob@p1.isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas1 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE [10] SIP UAC (alice-pc) to Voicemail server. INVITE sip:Voicemail@isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: sip:Bob@p1.isp.com Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Diversion: <sip:Bob@uas1.isp.com> ;reason=do-not-disturb Content-Type: application/sdp [11] Voicemail server to SIP UAC (alice-pc): SIP/2.0 200 OK Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com Contact: Voicemail@isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas2 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Content-Type: application/sdp [12] SIP UAC to Voicemail server: ACK sip:Voicemail@isp.com SIP/2.0 Via: SIP/2.0/UDP alice-pc.isp.com From: sip:alice@isp.com To: <sip:Bob@p1.isp.com>;tag=uas2 Call-ID: 12345600@alice-pc.isp.com CSeq: 1 INVITE Because the Diversion header is present, the Voicemail server is able to place Alice's message into Bob's voice mailbox. 8.3. Questions and Answers on Alternative Approaches Question 1: Why do we need the Diversion header when we can see the To: header? Answer: a) The To: header is not guaranteed to have significance to the called party. For example, the To: header may contain a locally significant URL (to the caller) such as a private numbering plan, speed dial digits, telephony escape digits, or telephony prefix digits. Without a Diversion header, enumerating all possible locally significant To: headers that anyone might use to contact Bob@uas1.isp.com becomes a configuration problem at Voicemail@isp.com and is prone to namespace collision. Support for Diversion headers enables Bob to contract a third- party service (Voicemail@isp.com) with a single globally significant URL for his voice mailbox (Bob@uas1.isp.com). b) Given a set of multiple diversions, there is a policy decision of which Diversion header takes precedence for service logic. Different services (or even different users for the same service) may want to configure this policy differently (first, last, second to last, etc.). Question 2: Why do we need the Diversion header when we can see the Via: header? Answer: The Via header does not contain information about servers whom have deflected the call (using a 3xx). 9. Mapping ISUP/ISDN Redirection Information to SIP Diversion Header The discussions below regarding ISUP/ISDN reflect generic elements in ISUP/ISDN. In some variations of ISUP/ISDN, the information elements are represented differently. Regardless of the ISUP/ISDN variant, translation should be performed for the "first redirecting number" and the "last redirecting number". In order to prevent ambiguity, it is important to highlight a terminology mismatch between ISUP/ISDN and SIP. In SIP, a "redirect" indicates the act of returning a 3xx response. In ISUP/ISDN, a "redirection" is diversion of a call by a network entity. In ISUP/ISDN, a call may also be deflected (by an endpoint). Diversion is the more generic term that refers to either the act of an network redirection or endpoint deflection. In SIP, Diversion can be implemented as either an upstream 3xx (non- recursive) or an additionally forked downstream request (recursive). In the following text, a lowercase "redirect" indicates the SIP usage, while an uppercase "Redirect" indicates ISUP usage. 9.1. Mapping ISUP/ISDN Diversion Reason Codes
EID 3083 (Verified) is as follows:

Section: 9.1

Original Text:

9.1 Mapping ISUP/ISDN Diversion Reason Codes

Corrected Text:

9.1 Mapping ISUP/ISDN Diversion Reason Codes

ISUP defines the following diversion reasons:
0001 = User busy
0010 = no reply
0011 = unconditional
0100 = deflection during alerting
0101 = deflection immediate response
0110 = mobile subscriber not reachable
0000 = Unknown

Mapping between ISUP reason codes and Diversion reason codes is
performed as follows:
ISUP reason code      Diversion reason code
0001                  "user-busy"
0010                  "no-answer"
0011                  "unconditional"
0100 or 0101          "deflection"
0110                  "unavailable"
0000                  all others
all others            "unknown"
Notes:
Section 9.1 mentions mapping with ISUP and ISDN but mapping with ISUP is missing. Indeed ISDN and ISUP reason parameter values are different.
This errata adds the ISUP mapping.
ISDN defines the following diversion reasons:
EID 3081 (Verified) is as follows:

Section: 9.1

Original Text:

ISUP and ISDN define the following diversion reasons:

Corrected Text:

ISDN defines the following diversion reasons:
Notes:
The listed reasons (code and text) are not ISUP but ISDN (DSS.1)
0000 = Unknown 0001 = Call forwarding busy or called DTE busy 0010 = Call forwarding no reply 1111 = Call forwarding unconditional or systematic call redirection 1010 = Call deflection or call forwarding by the called DTE 1001 = Call forwarding DTE out of order Mapping between ISDN reason codes and Diversion reason codes is performed as follows: ISDN reason code Diversion reason code 0001 "user-busy" 0010 "no-answer" 1111 "unconditional" 1010 "deflection" 1001 "unavailable" 0000 all others all others "unknown"
EID 3082 (Verified) is as follows:

Section: 9.1

Original Text:

Mapping of ISUP/ISDN reason codes to Diversion reason codes is
performed as follows:
ISUP/ISDN reason code Diversion reason code
0001                  "user-busy"
0010                  "no-answer"
1111                  "unconditional"
1010                  "deflection"
1001                  "unavailable"
0000                  all others

Corrected Text:

Mapping between ISDN reason codes and Diversion reason codes is
performed as follows:
ISDN reason code      Diversion reason code
0001                  "user-busy"
0010                  "no-answer"
1111                  "unconditional"
1010                  "deflection"
1001                  "unavailable"
0000                  all others
all others            "unknown"
Notes:
The reason codes are not ISUP but ISDN (ISUP deleted).
Missing the "all others" line in the ISDN to Diversion header mapping.
9.2. Mapping ISUP Redirection Information to SIP Diversion Header This section describes how generic ISUP diversion information elements may be translated across an ISUP/SIP gateway. 9.2.1. ISUP Definitions Called Party Number The number of the party to which the call is currently being routed. Redirecting Number The number to which the call was being routed when the last diversion occurred. Redirecting Reason The reason that the last diversion occurred. Original Called Number The number to which the call was being routed when the first diversion occurred. Original Redirecting Reason The reason that the first diversion occurred. Redirection Counter The count of the total number of diversions that have occurred. Address Presentation Indication of whether presentation is allowed or restricted. 9.2.2. ISUP Parameters When a SIP call transits a SIP/ISUP gateway, the following information in the ISUP message should be examined/set when translating SIP Diversion headers to ISUP diversion information: 1) Redirecting Number 2) Redirecting Reason 3) Redirecting Address Presentation 4) Original Called Number 5) Original Redirecting Reason 6) Original Address Presentation 7) Redirection Counter An ISUP message contains information on the first and last diversions that occurred. The Redirection number is the number to which the call was being routed when the last diversion occurred. The Redirecting Reason is the reason that the last diversion occurred. The Original Called Number is the number to which the call was being routed when the first diversion occurred. The Original Redirecting Reason is the reason that the first diversion occurred. When only one Diversion has occurred, the number to which the call was being routed when the diversion occurred is in the Redirecting Number and the reason for that diversion is carried in the Redirect Reason. 9.2.3. ISUP to SIP Translation The ISUP Redirecting Number SHOULD be used to set the value of the name-addr of the top-most Diversion header. The ISUP Redirecting Number address presentation SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion-privacy of the top-most Diversion header. The ISUP Redirecting Reason SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion- reason of the top-most Diversion header. When present, the Original Called Number SHOULD be used to set the name-addr of the bottom-most Diversion header. When present, the Original Redirecting Reason SHOULD be used to set the diversion-reason of the bottom-most Diversion header. When present, the Original Address Presentation SHOULD be used to set the diversion-privacy of the bottom-most Diversion header. The Redirection Counter value minus 1 SHOULD be stored in the diversion- counter associated with the top-most Diversion header. Presence of the diversion-counter for the bottom-most Diversion header is optional. If present, the diversion-counter of the bottom- most Diversion header SHOULD be 1. 9.2.4. SIP to ISUP Translation The name-addr of the top-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the ISUP Redirecting Number. The diversion-reason of the top-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the ISUP Redirecting Reason. The diversion-privacy of the top-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the ISUP Redirecting Address Presentation. When multiple Diversion headers are present, the name-addr of the bottom- most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the ISUP Original Redirecting Number. When multiple Diversion headers are present, the diversion-reason of the bottom-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the ISUP Original Redirecting Reason. When multiple Diversion headers are present, the diversion-privacy of the bottom-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the ISUP Original Redirecting Address Presentation. The ISUP Redirection Counter SHOULD be set equal to the sum of the counters of all Diversion headers in the SIP message. A Diversion header that does not explicitly specify a diversion-counter tag counts as 1. 9.2.5. Example of ISUP to SIP Translation ISUP/SIP GW | --IAM--------------------------------->| Called Party Number =+19195551004 | Redirecting Number =+19195551002 | Address Presentation =presentation restricted Original Called Number =+19195551001 | RedirectionInformation: | Original Redirecting Reason = Unconditional (1111) Redirecting Reason = User busy (0001) Redirection Counter = 5 | | |--INVITE +19195551004------> | Diversion: <tel:+19195551002> | ;reason=user-busy | ;privacy="full" | ;counter=4 | Diversion: <tel:+19195551001> | ;reason=unconditional | ;counter=1 | | 9.2.6. Example of SIP to ISUP Translation ISUP/SIP GW | |<--INVITE +19195551004------ | Diversion: <tel:+19195551002> | ;reason=user-busy | ;privacy="full" | ;counter=4 | Diversion: <tel:+19195551001> | ;reason=unconditional | ;counter=1 | | | <--IAM---------------------------------| Called Party Number =+19195551004 | Redirecting Number =+19195551002 | Address Presentation =presentation restricted Original Called Number =+19195551001 | RedirectionInformation: | Original Redirecting Reason = Unconditional (1111) Redirecting Reason = User busy (0001) Redirection Counter = 5 | 9.3. Mapping ISDN Redirection Information to SIP Diversion Header An ISDN message can contain up to two instances of a Redirecting Number information element. When a diversion occurs, an additional Redirection number information element is added. When a third (or greater) diversion occurs, the new Redirecting Number information element replaces the bottom-most Redirection number information element. 9.3.1. ISDN Definitions Called Party Number The number of the party to which the call is currently being routed. Redirecting Number information element Aggregate information element that contains Redirecting number and Reason for diversion. Redirecting Number The number to which the call was being routed when the last diversion occurred. Reason for Diversion The reason that the last diversion occurred. Origin of Number Indicates whether the number is user provided and screened or network provided. Presentation Status Indicates if presentation is allowed or prohibited. 9.3.2. ISDN Parameters When a SIP call transits a SIP/ISDN gateway, the following information in the ISDN message should be examined/set when translating SIP Diversion headers to ISDN diversion information: 1) Redirecting Number of the top-most Redirecting Number information element 2) Reason for diversion of the top-most Redirection number information element 3) Origin of Number and Presentation Status of the top-most Redirection number information element 4) Redirection number of the bottom-most Redirection number information element 5) Reason for diversion of the bottom-most Redirection number information element 6) Origin of Number and Presentation Status of the bottom-most Redirection number information element An ISDN message contains information on the first and last diversions that occurred. The top-most Redirection number information element contains information (including the Redirecting Number, Origin of Number, Presentation Status, and Reason for diversion) about the last diversion that occurred. The bottom-most Redirection number information element contains information (including the Redirecting Number, Origin of Number, Presentation Status, and Reason for diversion) about the first diversion that occurred. If only one Diversion has occurred, only one Redirection number information element is present. The Redirecting Number information element has the same Type of Number/Numbering Plan, and Digits as the Calling Party Number information element. There is no Redirection Counter associated with this ISDN information element. Notice that the order of the Redirection number information elements in an ISDN message (top=first, bottom=last) is reversed from the order of Diversion headers in a SIP message (top=last, bottom=first). 9.3.3. ISDN to SIP Translation The Redirecting Number of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the name-addr of the bottom-most Diversion header. The Reason for Diversion of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion-reason of the bottom-most Diversion header. The Origin of Number of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion- screen of the bottom-most Diversion header. The Presentation Status of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion-privacy of the bottom-most Diversion header. The Redirecting Number of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the name-addr of the top-most Diversion header. The Reason for Diversion of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion-reason of the top-most Diversion header. The Origin of Number of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion- screen of the top-most Diversion header. The Presentation Status of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element SHOULD be used to set the value of the diversion-privacy of the top-most Diversion header. Presence of the diversion-counter in each of the Diversion headers is optional. If present, the diversion-counter of each Diversion header SHOULD be 1. 9.3.4. SIP to ISDN Translation The name-addr of the top-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Redirecting Number of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. The diversion-reason of the top-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Reason for Diversion of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. The diversion-screen of the top-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Origin of Number of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. The diversion-privacy of the top-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Presentation Status of the bottom-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. The name-addr of the bottom-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Redirecting Number of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. The diversion-reason of the bottom-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Reason for Diversion of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. The diversion-screen of the bottom-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Origin of Number of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. The diversion-privacy of the bottom-most Diversion header SHOULD be used to set the Presentation Status of the top-most ISDN Redirecting Number information element. 9.3.5. Example of ISDN to SIP Translation ISDN/SIP GW | --Setup------------------------------->| Called party number =+19195551004 Redirecting Number information element: Redirecting Number =+19195551001 Reason for redirection = Unconditional (1111) Origin of Number = passed network screening Presentation Status = presentation allowed Redirecting Number information element: Redirecting Number =+19195551002 Reason for redirection = User busy (0001) Origin of Number = passed network screening Presentation Status = presentation prohibited | |--INVITE tel:+19195551004----> | Diversion: <tel:+19195551002> | ;reason=user-busy | ;screen="yes" | ;privacy="off" | Diversion: <tel:+19195551001> | ;reason=unconditional | ;screen="yes" | ;privacy="full" | | 9.3.6. Example of SIP to ISDN Translation ISDN/SIP GW | <--Setup-------------------------------| Called party number =+19195551004 Redirecting Number information element: Redirecting Number =+19195551001 Reason for redirection = Unconditional (1111) Origin of Number = passed network screening Presentation Status = presentation allowed Redirecting Number information element: Redirecting Number =+19195551002 Reason for redirection = User busy (0001) Origin of Number = passed network screening Presentation Status = presentation prohibited | |<--INVITE tel:+19195551004---- | Diversion: <tel:+19195551002> | ;reason=user-busy | ;screen="yes" | ;privacy="off | Diversion: <tel:+19195551001> | ;reason=unconditional | ;screen="yes" | ;privacy="full" | 9.4. Information Loss in SIP to ISUP/ISDN Translation Because ISUP and ISDN only support a subset of the information in a SIP Diversion header, information loss occurs during translation at a SIP/ISUP or SIP/ISDN boundary. 9.4.1. Loss of Diversion URI Information Because ISUP and ISDN only support a subset of URI types (specifically tel: URIs and sip:x@y;user=phone URIs), diversion information occurring for other URI types may be lost when crossing from SIP to ISDN or ISUP. 9.4.2. Loss of Diversion Reason Information Because ISUP and ISDN only support a subset of the reason codes supported by the Diversion header, specific reason code information may be lost when crossing from SIP to ISDN or ISUP. 9.4.3. Loss of Diversion Counter Information Because ISDN does not support a counter field (indicating the number of diversions that have occurred), counter information may be lost when crossing from SIP to ISDN. 10. Contributors Special acknowledgement to both Bryan Byerly and JR Yang. As original authors of this document, both were instrumental is getting this document written. 11. Acknowledgements We would like to thank David Williams, Ameet Kher, Satya Khatter, Manoj Bhatia, Shail Bhatnagar, Denise Caballero-Mccann, Kara Adams, Charles Eckel of Cisco Systems, and Bert Culpepper of InterVoice- Brite for their insights, inputs, and comments. 12. Normative References [RFC2119] Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels", BCP 14, RFC 2119, March 1997. [RFC3261] Rosenberg, J., Schulzrinne, H., Camarillo, G., Johnston, A., Peterson, J., Sparks, R., Handley, M., and E. Schooler, "SIP: Session Initiation Protocol", RFC 3261, June 2002. Authors' Addresses Steve Levy Cisco Systems 7025 Kit Creek Road P.O. Box 14987 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA EMail: stlevy@cisco.com Marianne Mohali (editor) Orange Labs 38-40 rue du General Leclerc Issy-Les-Moulineaux Cedex 9 92794 France Phone: +33145294514 EMail: marianne.mohali@orange-ftgroup.com